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Applying for Special Needs Education

By: Jack Claridge - Updated: 12 Feb 2019 | comments*Discuss
 
Special Needs Education Special Needs

You may think that it is a daunting task finding the right school for your child and even more so if your child requires special needs education but we can offer the following advice.

What Help May Be Needed?
Most children with special educational needs can be tutored through mainstream education but there are those who require assistance outside the remit of state education. These children can sometimes have problems which may range from problems with reading and writing, expressing themselves or understanding what others say, making friends and/or relating to adults, conducting themselves properly in an educational setting or having a physical or sensory condition which may affect their schooling.

Assessments
If your child does not seem to be making significant progress at school your local authority may step in and make the decision to carry out an assessment as to your child’s needs, which is based on the advice of specialists. This may sound an arduous endeavour but your local authority will have a wealth of specialists that they can call upon to offer informed advice and assessments.

These assessments referred to as a ‘statutory assessment’ are geared to finding out exactly the nature of your child’s needs and how to best serve them. But this is only necessary if your child’s school cannot provide all the help required.

You can apply for an assessment through your local authority and usually within a time frame of six weeks they will tell you whether or not an assessment is going to be carried out. Should an assessment go ahead your local authority will seek the advice of certain individuals and they will be asked to give their considered opinion on your child’s needs. Usually they will seek advice from:

  • Your child’s current school
  • A doctor – either your family GP or an independent GP
  • Social Services (who will only comment if your child is known to them) or
  • An Educational Psychologist
You can attend any interviews, medical or physical examinations, and air your views. After all, no one knows your child better than you, and your views are important and may offer up important information. Your child’s thoughts and feelings are important too and will play a large role in the assessment process.

After the Assessment
Once the assessments have been completed they are reviewed by what are known as SEN Officers (Special Education Needs) and it is they who will decide to document all the information they have collected in a ‘statement of special educational needs’. Normally your local authority will tell you if it is going to compile this statement within 12 weeks of assessments beginning.

If your local authority decides not to write a statement then they must explain their reasons and make clear to you how it thinks that your child’s needs are to be met in a school setting.

If Your LA Does Not Assess
Should your local authority think it unnecessary to assess your child’s special needs requirements then they are legally required to write and inform you of this and also inform the school of its findings. Given that sometimes parents, schools and local authorities do not always agree, you or your child’s school can appeal this decision.

As part of this appeal process it may be necessary for you to enlist the assistance of an unbiased professional who has no prior knowledge of your child’s circumstances.

It is usually possible to sort out these problems with your local authority in an informal and friendly manner but should you feel unsatisfied with its decision you can appeal to an independent organisation, the Special Educational Needs and Disability Tribunal.

Although it may sound like a minefield of problems and stress, as a general rule it can all run smoothly.

Speak to your child’s head teacher and teachers if you can and have them give references or reports as to your child’s behaviour or what they feel are your child’s requirements. You will find that they are happy to help and also you will find that the local authorities are more than helpful in this manner too.

Remember, at all times, not to lose sight of the goal which is to ensure your child receives the best education they can regardless of their circumstances.

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[Add a Comment]
My Yr 2 child attends an independent school.His school reports show that he has been 'emerging' since he started.The school has opted out of Ofsted inspections and measures pupils using their own methodology.Do independent schools have to adhere to national testing?If this is the case then is 'emerging' short-hand for 'not meeting expectations for his chronological age? I ask because the school follow their own curriculum and employ new QTS or unqualified teachers and so it's impossible to work out my sons's progress against the local state schools (which I think would offer better quality teaching).
Harriet - 12-Feb-19 @ 4:35 PM
I am trying to find schools which have support from Slow processing Speed, anxiety, poor attainment (2 years behind), poor working memory.I can't seem to find anywhere.
Candice - 9-Jan-19 @ 1:55 PM
I teach a moderately autistic 7 year old boy in an inclusive international school. The family are suddenly being relocated to London. He has a statement (albeit in another country) which diagnoses him with autism. What can the family do? They need a school for August.
Vix - 7-Jun-17 @ 11:07 PM
Alessandro - Your Question:
Hi, I'm relocating to the UK from abroad and I've got a 13 years old boy with SEN (some limitations which are not affecting his capabilities in understanding, processing and studying as other boys do) as a foreigner he will also be a ESL. Have you heard of any case like this one? Any success story which can relief some pressure on my neck? How the school can face this double challenge?Thanks in advance for your kind feedback and advice.

Our Response:
When you apply to the Local Education Authority, then you will have to highlight his needs. It is widely understood by the LEA that some learners may fall into both camps by needing to learn English as an additional language and yet also having special educational needs.
GetTheRightSchool - 18-Nov-15 @ 11:59 AM
Hi, I'm relocating to the UK from abroad and I've got a 13 years old boy with SEN (some limitations which are not affecting his capabilities in understanding, processing and studying as other boys do) as a foreigner he will also be a ESL. Have you heard of any case like this one? Any success story which can relief some pressure on my neck? How the school can face this double challenge? Thanks in advance for your kind feedback and advice.
Alessandro - 17-Nov-15 @ 6:32 PM
alzalan - Your Question:
I am an international student, I am new to the UK and I have 10years boy who has difficulty in reading and writing. So what is the solution he should start school within a few weeks and I don't know what will happen after this year when he became 11 as I feel he will still need more year in primary school.

Our Response:
I shouldn't worry - the school will assess your son's ability and will stream him accordingly, and give him extra help where he needs it.
GetTheRightSchool - 9-Sep-15 @ 2:34 PM
I am an international student, I am new to the UK and I have 10years boy who has difficulty in reading and writing. So what is the solution he should start school within a few weeks and I don't know what will happen after this year when he became 11 as I feel he will still need more year in primary school.
alzalan - 8-Sep-15 @ 1:26 PM
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